All posts tagged as william carr coll

14 Nov

Brilliant

In William Carr Collection by admwil / November 14, 2011 / 0 Comments

 

Photographers have a love of spontaneity.

An image captured with just a single click.

Just that one single click that freezes time.

But, I am a photographer who shares that love of spontaneity with a love of returning to the past, to places I have been before. A lonely beach in Polynesia. The ruins of an ancient castle in Austria. The sense memory of perfume wafting over a field of lavender in Provence. Pondering the music of the stones at an ancient Native American site.

So, it is with the thought of revisiting and reacquainting myself that I return to Oregon every Fall. I return to revisit my sensory memories and to renew them.

I load up my 4wd and head out, up to Oregon for a four day shoot. Fall seems to have come early this year. There’s a definite bite in the air and the birds are sparse. They’ve headed south weeks ago, leaving just a few hungry strays lingering.

I stop frequently to see the ocean, venturing out on the towering cliffs. The mist has a chill in it, a salty taste of the approaching winter.

I drive a narrow coastal route, remote and still. I stop for lunch and to wade the tide pools that are tucked like pockets into the bottom of the cliffs. Nestled into remote beaches and caves, they glimmer like dark jewels protected by towering walls.

I head inland, passing miles of trees. Their leaves have turned a fiery red as per the seasonal decree of Mother Nature. They stand in stark contrast to to the dark and gloomy day that surrounds us.

On the third day, I came upon an amazing tree. I had to capture it.

An ancient Japanese Maple, it was in the final days of a glorious and fiery display, a spectacular collage of deepening autumn hues. It stood like a timeless patriarch in a secret garden of scarlet and crimson, it’s beautiful branches bending like the arms of a dancer.

The challenge now was in finding the light. The day was overcast and dark like all the mornings so far. It was chilly and damp, dark and gloomy. It was nothing like the blazing tree in front of me.

I studied the best way to bring to light the magestic stature of grace and strength of this iconic tree. I juggled my camera  from a hundred different angles, hoping that some sun would seep in from somewhere. There just was not enough light.

And , as I was trying to capture the image from all these angles, an amazing thing happened.

The sun broke throught with a beam of pure white light.

Starlight.

I felt a shudder, a sense of elation.

Something magical had just happened.

It was Brilliant, my latest release.

12 Jul

William Carr – The Early Years

In William Carr Collection by admwil / July 12, 2011 / 0 Comments

William Carr Gallery

No, the guy above isn’t an extra from the musical HAIR – it’s yours truly, back when I believed that true vision could change the world.

I still do.

As a regular feature on this blog, I’ve decided to present some of my earlier works of when I was starting out as a photographer. Thought it might prove to be an interesting visual timeline of my evolving techniques and style.

For the first image in this series, I’ll shine a light on The Portal, an image created, literally, very early on in my career.

THE PORTAL

The Portal belongs to the kind of image that I like to call ‘table top photography’. Early on, I would use everyday household items to create images that would help to learn key photographic principles such as lighting, depth of field, composition, etc. – and The Portal is a perfect example.

For this shot, I used a piece of white dryer vent hose, about 4 inches in diameter. Suspending it using wire coat hangers, I directed a red light bulb and a blue light bulb on the outside of the hose. In the background, I created a space field with a black art board with tiny pin holes for stars and pencil-colored velum paper for the planets.

I then took the shot in two exposures; the first was with the tube with the colored lights, the second was with the colored lights turned off but with a white light directed toward the camera thereby illuminating the tiny pin holes which simulated the stars and planets. The camera lens, incidentally, was just inside the tube demonstrating depth of field.

There you have it. Space, that infinite final frontier, recreated on a table top!

Thanks for taking the journey back with me. Check back often: I’ll dip down memory lane again soon.


Original music by William Carr

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